After Hard Times A Bankruptcy Car Loan Can Be Your Best Ally

After hard times, a bankruptcy car loan can be your best ally. The quickest way to rebuild your credit score is by committing to an auto loan and making the payments in a responsible way.

A bankruptcy car loan can be the key factor in that fresh new start toward rebuilding your credit. In this article we will talk about the best way to use a car loan after bankruptcy as an answer to establishing your new financial future.

Use the Internet to find local auto dealers or an auto consultant, if you don’t know of any, who will offer you special financing for a bankruptcy car loan. Not all dealers offer this service.

Visit a couple of these special financing dealerships and determine if it feels like a good fit for you. By asking a few questions you will get a feel of the type of people you will be working with. You want to work with someone who listens to you and helps you meet your needs and wants.

One source that most people don’t think about for special financing is to look for an auto consultant that offers these services. Usually an auto consultant (not an auto salesman) is more willing to work with you and will listen to you instead of just trying to sell you a car today.

Bankruptcy can be emotionally tough on anyone. The dealership should treat you will compassion and understanding. They should appear eager and willing to help you just as they would help someone with a perfect credit score. Finding a special financing dealership that treats you with dignity will help give you peace of mind that they will get you the best deal possible.

Next, decide on a used car that suits your family’s needs. Look for a car that has lower mileage and has been safety inspected and has a good history report. Take the car for a drive and see how it feels to you.

Before signing on the dotted line you want to make sure you can make the monthly payments easily each month. Take a look at your monthly income and be sure you have enough money every month for the payment, insurance and maintenance on the car.

Once you are confident that the bankruptcy car loan will work with the rest of your monthly bills, you are ready to sign the papers and move forward with your purchase.

As you drive your new used car off the parking lot know that getting a bankruptcy car loan is the greatest step you can take to rebuilding your financial future. Be sure and make all your payments on time, as this is one of the quickest ways to help rebuild your credit.

Car Loans After Bankruptcy Made Easier

Car loans after bankruptcy can be a little more difficult than your previous loan you may have applied for before your financial downfall. This does not mean that it is impossible to get a loan. Now there is good news for those looking for a new car after bankruptcy. Getting car loans after bankruptcy is more likely today for those who find themselves in these circumstances.

There are a few things that you can do to help you get the approval you need for a car loan. Let’s explore a few steps you can take to make car loans after bankruptcy easier.

Begin by double-checking your credit history reports. Pull your credit reports from Equifax, Transunion and Experian and go through them with a fine tooth comb to be sure that all debts that were to be removed in the bankruptcy are no longer on the reports. Sometimes, the bureaus can miss taking off a debt that has actually been discharged through your bankruptcy and this can lower your credit score more than it should.

You may want to draft up a letter to send to each of the three credit bureaus explaining the reasons for filing bankruptcy. If you had a setback due to a divorce, extreme medical bills or a temporary loss of job, this letter could give you a better chance at getting lower interest rates. Potential lenders will be able to read the explanation and may take this into consideration when deciding to grant you a car loan after bankruptcy. In addition, feel free to explain the steps you have taken to begin to rebuild your FICO score.

After reviewing your credit reports the next step would be to take a good hard look at your current finances. Evaluate the monthly payment you can realistically handle for a car loan along with all your other financial obligations. Don’t forget to allow for insurance and maintenance. Do your best to choose a car that will help you stay on track and make your monthly payments on time. Paying your car payment on or before the due date is the quickest way to rebuild your credit history.

Once you have successfully paid the car loan for a year, chances are good that you will have the opportunity to refinance with a lower interest rate. Make a note to yourself to recheck your credit score after the first year and begin to look for refinancing at that point. This could save you money over the balance of the car loan after bankruptcy.

And, finally research a car dealership or auto broker that has expertise in finding car loans after bankruptcy. Some dealerships and brokers have special finance departments. Because of the volume of special loans they secure, these experts can typically find you lower interest rates. And, this will make your monthly payments lower. With the lower monthly payments you will have a better chance to regain your financial borrowing power and improve your overall credit history.

When Gap Car Insurance Isn’t Necessary

Gap auto insurance, in case you didn’t know, picks up the tab if your car is totaled and you owe more than it’s worth. Although gap insurance coverage can be purchased for as little as $30 a year it isn’t always necessary.

One instance is if you pay cash for your new car; if you don’t have an unpaid loan balance, there is no financing gap to worry about.

However, paid for or not, a new car will still depreciate at the same rate. In this case you might want to look at New Car Replacement Insurance.

New car replacement insurance is offered by a number of carriers for different lengths of time. Some insurers offer replacement insurance for only a month while others, such as Allstate, offer a plan where “you may be able to get a totally new car” if totaled in the first three model years.

A second instance when you would not need gap insurance is if you put at least 20% down. In most cases if you put 20% down the rate at which the car loan is paid down should track pretty close to the depreciated value of your car.

Another situation where you might not need gap protection is if you lease a new or used car. In many states, such as New York, gap insurance is mandated by law to be included in the quoted lease payment amount.

Yet despite this there are unscrupulous sales people who will try to sell you gap insurance anyway – and it won’t come cheap. The gap insurance sold by car dealerships today is a high profit add on much like upholstery protection or under carriage coating was years ago.

The average one time payment for gap insurance purchased from a car dealer averages around $548. This is almost 5 times more than it would cost if purchased from a major insurance carrier for as long as you needed it.

The last example illustrates why you would need gap insurance, but for only a short period of time.

The recent loosening of bank purse strings has also meant lower car financing rates for both new and used cars. As a matter of fact the rates are very similar. At these new low rates the outstanding loan balance and depreciated car value quickly reach parity – usually within two years.

However, that first year of car ownership is still a killer for car values. For instance, if you borrowed $40,000 for 60 months at 6% with zero down, 20% of the loan would be paid in the first year but your car would have depreciated 25%. This would leave you owing roughly $2,500 more than the insurance company would pay out if your car was totaled during the first year of ownership.

But, as previously mentioned, during the second year of ownership the value or your car and the loan balance would even out. So although you won’t be able to eliminate the purchase of gap insurance entirely, you would only need it for the first year of ownership.